Publications

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Selection of texts from the catalogue for the solo painting and ceramics exhibition at the Antonio Pérez Foundation in Cuenca, 2000

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“When examining the surfaces of Sohad Lachiri, it is necessary to behave like a dazed follower of flying clouds, finding in natural reality similarities that resemble the painted forms. So the viewer has to work a little. Apart from this inconvenience, the artist titles her work, an unforgivably audacious act for the peace of mind of those partaking, who might even find knowing the artist’s ideas counterproductive, without realizing that the title is often no more than an identifier. In this very cryptic manner, the names of the works play a role which is in no way literary, despite the fact that they express themselves literally.”  Isidoro Valcárcel

 

Acrylic allows Sohad Lachiri to delineate large areas of color in a clean, schematic, Matisse-like way, organizing them into a vibrant drawing.”

“… behind these powerful, emblematic images, evidence of another culture, there is a rich, and at times mysterious, symbolic undertone, which the titles highlight.” Juan Manuel Bonet

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Text from the catalogue for the exhibition at Termino Gallery in Madrid, 1990

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Sohad Lachiri or Clarity’,  What is strange about these paintings, which appear to be very abstract, is their intent, or rather their figurative subject matter, and their very clear reference to the world of feelings. If you speak with Sohad Lachiri, she will tell you that she paints everyday objects, sayings, proverbs, feelings and emotions. It is all very revitalizing and stimulating. She defines herself and moves away from the mimetic positions, now intolerable because of their banality and opportunism, so common in art today.” Gerardo Rueda

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Text from a letter to Sohad Lachiri, in “Cartas Reunidas” (“Collected Letters” by Javier Seguí de la Riva, 1999

 

“The things that stand out in this interplay of backgrounds are generally powerful, closed shapes which seem like direct icons that recall the objects/presences of Dadaism and concrete art or the objects/symbols of Pop Art. In addition, the paintings have a dense, closed style, in which it is difficult to make out individual brushstrokes, tentative germinal gestures that give shape to the works.” Javier Seguí